Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money–That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (2000)

Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money–That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (2000)

Robert T. Kiyosaki

Rich Dad, Poor Dad follows the true and enlightening story written by Robert T. Kiyosaki about two men on the Hawaiian Islands. The book explores the life of the author’s father, once the superintendent of education in Hawaii, who died penniless. The contrasting story explores the life choices of the author’s best friend’s father, who dropped out of school at 13 and became one of the wealthiest men in Hawaii.

The story challenges traditional conventions on what attitudes and methods generate wealth in an intimate and impressionable way. With an entire millennium facing the future of young men and women, innovative and creative financial strategies are necessary for not only survival, but to flourish.

Kiyosaki creates a compelling and thought provoking argument for an education in financial literacy seldom taught in schools. Kiyosaki seeks to convince his readers that income-generating investments outlast any conventional job. He illustrates this notion with examples from his personal observations between his own father, and the father of his friend.

This riveting saga provides a narrative explanation for why those who earn their biweekly paychecks through an honest living never seem to make enough to support their families. Every point leads back to the idea that the poor and middle class work for their money, and the rich have their money work for them.

However, although the emotional and inspirational quality of the book is undeniable, the actual plan to achieve wealth seems insufficiently addressed. There seems to be a level of contempt for the author’s own father, a man who spent his life providing for his family.

Despite these shortcomings, the book provides an opportunity for an open mind. The book flows easily and provides an interesting and invigorating story. Readers should at least feel a lasting impression, and think differently about how they earn their money.